Random Borrowing #17: Politics

The next random item from the library is a book that I would normally run away from very fast. It is Open Australia by Lindsay Tanner. Lindsay Tanner was a fairly high level politician in the Australian Labour Party.

LabourFront

This book appears to be the result of a few days of literary diarrhea on his holidays.  LabourBackIt is a rambling outline of his political philosophy, I guess. Hence, his ability to get high profile politicians to put quotes on the back cover of his book. I wonder who would willingly read this kind of stuff.

Anyway, I picked a random page and tried to extract what his point was, which was difficult because he’s a politician. In summary:

  1. Politicians seem to only know about the opinions of a very small minority of people.
  2. Education about the nitty gritty politics of government is good.
  3. Governments are moving from exercising power via command to exercising it through negotiation and persuasion.

So I can try to map this to music:

  1. people professionally involved in the music business or in music education are most definitely a small minority compared to the vast majority of consumers of music.
  2. education about the types of music in popular culture could be useful in allowing composers to be more relevant to their audience.
  3. Music is written and performed in a very different way nowadays than in bygone eras. Computers allow anyone to write, record, mix, use samples, apply sophisticated effects in a way that only top studios could do a few decades ago.

Contemplating this made me examine my own process for writing music. By this, I mean the entire process from conception to the production of a sound file. I made a couple of charts. This is an incomplete summary of what I have done. It doesn’t include what I will do in the future though. It is definitely a “work in progress”.

The first diagram is an outline of the mecahnics of how I compose. The end result is notation entered into Noteflight, an online music notation program.Composing

 

After I have a composition notated, it’s time to make a sound file that sounds better than the audio output of the Noteflight software.

Making a Recording

Here, the final out is really a project in Reaper, the DAW that I use. The final-final output is an mp3 that I upload to Soundcloud.

Each of these little block can be expanded on a lot. Especially, the Reaper part. Even the “Room” can be experimented with, using different recording locations with interesting reverb.